Friday, February 29, 2008

Now try the stick; the carrot didn't work!

"Now try the stick; the carrot didn't work!"

I am claiming this as my saying. What a braggart I am.




Thursday, February 28, 2008

Carbon Trading: Today big news about registry delays

I will take some credit for getting this ball rolling. I started to
complain to journalists about the EUA Deliveries being delayed. Seems to
have struck a chord with some bigger players. I had worried that all big
players would not care since most trade forward or futures. Yesterday it
was the Czech Registry, Today Germany, the UK.

Daniel Butler

Full stories at bottom:
Subject: wt wallich- Czech Grant of 2008 Emission Permits Will Be Del

A late allocation will put eastern Europe emission traders at
a disadvantage compared with traders in western Europe, where
permits may be granted faster, said Daniel Butler, senior
consultant at Wallich & Matthes in Prague, a securities firm and
brokerage.
``Eastern Europeans usually have little access to forward
trading due to poor credit lines,'' Butler said. ``They rather
trade only spot EU allowances.''
Eastern European factories and power stations will be hurt
particularly should prices fall and they don't yet have permits to
sell, Butler said.


Subject: ``early summer''German Grant of 2008 Emission Permits Delaye

other than those with whom i've already spoke, who else is
degressed/angry by
this? comments my way. Are the regulators competent, at a time when they
are
trying to tell the world that emissions trading is the way? I'm seeking
clarification on the length of the delay.


``This market is becoming a farce because of the lack of
transparency,'' said Phil Brown, chief executive officer of Climate Spot
Exchange, a proposed bourse in London for emissions traders. ``The lack
of information is incredibly frustrating in a
multibillion-dollar market.''

``I am livid, absolutely furious about the incompetence by
regulators,'' said Gerhard Mulder, vice president of eco markets at ABN
Amro Holding NV in Amsterdam. ``The commission and most member states
disregard the rules that markets play by.''


Story 1 of 2
Czech Grant of 2008 Emission Permits Will Be Delayed (Update1)
2008-02-27 12:38 (New York)


(Adds comment in fourth paragraph, other nations in eighth.)

By Mathew Carr
Feb. 27 (Bloomberg) -- The Czech Republic will delay its
allocation of carbon dioxide permits for 2008, blaming technical
faults in the European Union system that tracks ownership of the
allowances, according to its registry.
Permits for this year are supposed to be allotted by the end
of this month, a deadline set by the European Commission, which
regulates the program. The EU emissions-trading system is the
world's biggest greenhouse-gas market.
The country's registry committee will revisit the allocation
at ``the end of April,'' according to a notice on the registry's
Web site. Registry manager Miroslav Rehor declined to specify in an
e-mail when the government would allocate permits. National, EU and
United Nations registries that track ownership of emission permits
and credits are being completed by government bodies.
A late allocation will put eastern Europe emission traders at
a disadvantage compared with traders in western Europe, where
permits may be granted faster, said Daniel Butler, senior
consultant at Wallich & Matthes in Prague, a securities firm and
brokerage.
``Eastern Europeans usually have little access to forward
trading due to poor credit lines,'' Butler said. ``They rather
trade only spot EU allowances.''
Eastern European factories and power stations will be hurt
particularly should prices fall and they don't yet have permits to
sell, Butler said.

Price Plunge

Grants of permits are being delayed this year after the
commission allowed too many permits to be awarded in the three
years through 2007, causing the price to fall as low as 2 euro
cents ($0.03) a metric ton, according to prices from the BlueNext
SA exchange in Paris. The EU is trying to prod the U.S. into
adopting emissions trading to help limit greenhouse gases blamed
for global warming.
Germany and Poland are among nations that will probably fail
to issue carbon dioxide permits to factories and power stations by
the February deadline, Point Carbon said on Feb. 20, citing a
survey of officials from member nations.
A maximum of 11 of 27 countries are likely to issue by the
deadline, Oslo-based research and publishing company Point Carbon
said at the time. They plan to allocate 614 million allowances a
year, compared with a total cap of more than 2 billion, the report
said. The U.K. has said it will issue on time.

--Editors: Amanda Jordan, Will Kennedy

To contact the reporter on this story:
Mathew Carr in London at +44-20-7073-3531 or
m.carr@bloomberg.net

--

Story 2 of 2


Germany, U.K. Delay Grants of Carbon Dioxide Permits (Update1)
2008-02-28 07:58 (New York)


(Adds U.K. delay starting in first paragraph, comment from
climate bourse CEO in fourth, banker in sixth.)

By Mathew Carr and Thom Rose
Feb. 28 (Bloomberg) -- Germany and the U.K., Europe's two
biggest emitters of carbon dioxide, delayed their allocation of
2008 carbon dioxide allowances because European Union and United
Nations ownership-tracking systems are incomplete.
``Contrary to previous plans, it currently appears that the
European Commission will probably only be able to create the
connection with the international coordination system of the
climate secretariat in early summer 2008,'' according to the Web
site of German emissions body Dehst. ``Germany is working to
speed up this process.''
The permits were supposed to be granted by the end of this
month under a deadline set by the European Commission, which
regulates the bloc's emissions trading. The climate secretariat
is the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. The
lack of allocation will hamper spot trading in the EU's program,
the world's biggest greenhouse-gas trading system, during its
five-year second phase through 2012.
``This market is becoming a farce because of the lack of
transparency,'' said Phil Brown, chief executive officer of
Climate Spot Exchange, a proposed bourse in London for emissions
traders. ``The lack of information is incredibly frustrating in a
multibillion-dollar market.''

EU Allocations

The EU's 27 nations will allocate allowances equivalent to
about 2.08 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide for 2008. At
forward prices of 21.09 euros a ton, they are worth 44 billion
euros ($66 billion), according to prices from the European
Climate Exchange in London. Both Climate Spot Exchange and ECX
are units of Climate Exchange Plc, based in the Isle of Man, U.K.
``I am livid, absolutely furious about the incompetence by
regulators,'' said Gerhard Mulder, vice president of eco markets
at ABN Amro Holding NV in Amsterdam. ``The commission and most
member states disregard the rules that markets play by.''
Commission spokeswoman Barbara Helfferich didn't immediately
respond to requests for comment sent by e-mail and telephone.
Britain has delayed its allocation by an unspecified number
of weeks.
``The U.K. hopes to be able to issue carbon allowances with
minimal delay and in the meantime activity in the carbon markets
will continue to operate as normal because the bulk of EU-
allowance trading is in the secondary market using forward
contracts,'' the country's Department for Environment, Food and
Rural Affairs said today in an e-mailed statement.
Germany's Dehst said the nation's allocation plan hadn't yet
been approved by the commission.

--Editors: Kristen Schweizer, Amanda Jordan

To contact the reporters on this story:
Mathew Carr in London at +44-20-7073-3531 or
m.carr@bloomberg.net;
Thom Rose in Frankfurt at +49-69-92041-127 or
trose5@bloomberg.net

Saturday, February 23, 2008

Subway Knight Rider

There are these people in Prague that really go all out and dress up as medieval knights and pages, etc. So funny to see them with their earnest pursuit of authenticity. But when you encounter one on the metro, the context just makes you smile.

This guy didn't mind the photo op.

Serbians. They are nuts.

Friday, February 22, 2008

Hillary Shrillary. Lets call her Shrillary

Clinton's Best Moment Not Really Hers?

 

The Obama campaign wasted no time in sending out an email that claims Clinton's best moment of the night was plagiarized from John Edwards.

Clinton: “You know, whatever happens, we're going to be fine. You know, we have strong support from our families and our friends. I just hope that we'll be able to say the same thing about the American people. And that's what this election should be about.”

Edwards: “What's not at stake are any of us. All of us are going to be just fine no matter what happens in this election. But what's at stake is whether America is going to be fine.” AND “I want to say this to everyone: with Elizabeth, with my family, with my friends, with all of you and all of your support, this son of a millworker's gonna be just fine. Our job now is to make certain that America will be fine.”

 

 

Lets call here Shrillary

 

<tag>Hillary</tag>

 

http://blogs.tnr.com/tnr/blogs/the_plank/archive/2008/02/21/clinton-s-best-moment-not-really-hers.aspx

 

 

http://blogs.tnr.com/tnr/blogs/the_plank/default.aspx

 

Thursday, February 21, 2008

[From: d] BBC man criticises 'war bias'

d spotted this on the guardian.co.uk site and thought you should see it.

To see this story with its related links on the guardian.co.uk site, go to http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2003/mar/26/bbc.Iraqandthemedia

BBC man criticises 'war bias'
Jason Deans
Wednesday March 26 2003
MediaGuardian


The BBC's coverage of the war has come under fire from one of its own correspondents in the Gulf who has fired off a furious memo claiming the corporation is misleading viewers about the conflict in Iraq.

Paul Adams, the BBC's defence correspondent who is based at the coalition command centre in Qatar, complained that the corporation was conveying a untruthful picture of how the war was progressing.

Adams accused the BBC's coverage of exaggerating the military impact of casualties suffered by UK forces and downplaying their achievements on the battlefield during the first few days of the conflict.

"I was gobsmacked to hear, in a set of headlines today, that the coalition was suffering 'significant casualties'. This is simply not true," Adams said in the memo.

"Nor is it true to say - as the same intro stated - that coalition forces are fighting 'guerrillas'. It may be guerrilla warfare, but they are not guerrillas," he stormed.

"Who dreamed up the line that the coalition are achieving 'small victories at a very high price?' The truth is exactly the opposite. The gains are huge and costs still relatively low. This is real warfare, however one-sided, and losses are to be expected," Adams continued.

The memo, which has been leaked to the Sun newspaper, was sent to BBC executives including the head of TV news programmes, Roger Mosey, and his radio counterpart, Stephen Mitchell.

The BBC has come under attack for describing the loss of two soldiers as the "worst possible news for the armed forces".

Labour MP Alice Mahon has also complained that the BBC is too pro-war and is not showing enough of the casualties inflicted on the Iraqis or the problems with humanitarian aid.

Earlier this week the BBC was forced to promise that it would no longer show footage of seriously injured British troops, after the mother of a Royal Marine watched her son set on fire during a gun battle on a BBC early evening bulletin.

A BBC spokeswoman said the corporation could not confirm the contents of what was an internal memo.

But she added that the BBC was not the only news organisation highlighting British casualties.

"This is an immensely complicated and difficult story and the big challenge for the BBC, as for other broadcasters, is getting the balance right. We are constantly monitoring the language and tone of reports to achieve this balance," the spokeswoman said.

"We think we get it right most of the time, but we know we don't always. This seems to have been an internal memo and we can't confirm its content, but this is the kind of debate about editorial tone that's going on in newsrooms all over the world about this particular story."

Copyright Guardian Newspapers Limited 2008

If you have any questions about this email, please contact the guardian.co.uk user help desk: userhelp@guardian.co.uk.

Friday, February 15, 2008

How to Beat a Woman and a Black Man?

(for president, I mean).


Choose a Black Woman as your running mate.

Condi.


It is not likely, but it would be kind of cool.




.

Monday, February 11, 2008

Bill Maher

Just saw him on Larry King.

 

Never before did I have the feeling that Larry King wanted to slap someone.

 

I wish I could have been there to do it.

 

 

.