Wednesday, June 20, 2007

Zombies.

I have just had two pleasant zombie experiences.

The first was Grindhouse. I don't mean to say that the Zombies were fantastic, but I did like the movie (s?).

Its funny how most of the movie was 'referencing' or paying homage to, or celebrating.. the movies and tv shows of the 70s. But so much did that you have to wonder what all the people who didn't grow up with it would think. I mean, I could probably notice about 70% of all the stuff that Tarantino was slipping into Death Proof. It reminds me of some cult Japanese movie that I might have seen and thought was pretty good, but still have to admit that there was probably a lot going on in the background that I will never catch.

The zombie stuff was ok. What made me mention it in the title was that just after it I listened to World War Z by Max Brooks on mp3. (I have been listening to a bunch lately since I do long dog walks in the morning and evening, and books on tape - uh, mp3 - is good for that or long drives ).

WWZ was really great. I mean it. Usually book s on tape will be read by one guy who slightly affects his voice for accents, different types of guys or even female characters. But in WWZ he had guys like Alan Alda doing big parts. The book was in the form of a series of interviews so this worked well.

The book is about the aftermath of a zombie infestation. I marveled at the many little facets of the whole story that are never developed in movies. In the films you only get the scene from inside the shopping mall for example. This took into account the globe and the author has convinced me that he actually visited many of the places in which he set his characters.

Oh, Max Brooks is the son of Mel Brooks and apparently wrote a bit for Saturday Night Live. He played the interviewer.

Criticism? This may be odd but if you are from New York like me, (well originally) you should get it. There were no characters from the South. IT was totally bigotted, if you want to be mean spirited. I mean, I also think southern accents sound retarded. (man I am going to make enemies). But what he did was to populate the american character roles with guys that are all sounding like Jackie Mason, Borschfelt comedians. Really. Rob Reiner, Alan Alda and some others. All like New Yorkers that say the word "pastrami' in exactly the same way. So I ask myself, why did he do that?

Oh, and Max Brooks' accent? NOT a new york accent. Guess he grew up on the west coast.

But enough of that little pet peeve. The book was great. It really went into so many little oddities and great fictional stories. It created great detail like calling the zombies stuck in cars, "grabbers" since they were not aware enough to open the seatbelt or the door to get out, but were doomed to decomposition right there in the seat. Although, the pace of decomposition seemed to take much longer than 28 days as in the Danny Boyle movie. The use of snow and zombies freezing and then thawing was cool, too.

The book on mp3 left some things out, as I learned from a review and the mention of a scene in the '5 colleges' I think. I now have to get the book as well.


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2 comments:

Anonymous said...

What has WWZ got to do with the Danny Boyle movie?

For starters, in 28 days later, they weren't zombies. They were people infected with the virus 'rage'. Secondly, it didn't take them 28 days to decompose, it took them 28 days to starve to death.

What the hell is wrong with you

Dantravels said...

Someone posted (anonymously*), this in reference to my earlier "zombies" post.

Anonymous has left a new comment on your post "Zombies.":

What has WWZ got to do with the Danny Boyle movie?

For starters, in 28 days later, they weren't zombies. They were people infected with the virus 'rage'. Secondly, it didn't take them 28 days to decompose, it took them 28 days to starve to death.

What the hell is wrong with you

I think that 28 days laters is definitely in the genre of zombie movies. (what is wrong with YOU, the anonymous poster?). And the point of the post is that World War Z was an Intelligent zombie book. As 28 Days Later, was really an intelligent zombie-like movie. I loved it. I am sorry if you (the anonymous poster) are pedantically opposed to associating this great film with zombies. And yes, they did starve in the movie and they did decompose in the book. (I rather think the decomposition issue was poorly handled in World War Z; it seems that it should have taken a much shorter time. Some zombies were active for a long, long time).

*Anonymous posting: I hate that. You would think that they would want to put their name to an angry post. Guess they have no guts.